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Poster: Erniest Date: May 8, 2005 6:44pm
Forum: prelinger Subject: Re: Educational And/Or Commercial Uses of the Archives

I don't know anythig about copyright, but doing DVD's is really esay if you use Nero software. You will have the disk in one or two hours, depending on the PC speed. It's easy to use and will guide you through the whole process.
I'm not involved with Nero, just paid mt licence fee and I'm happy with it.

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Poster: Visual16 Date: May 8, 2005 8:10pm
Forum: prelinger Subject: Re: Educational And/Or Commercial Uses of the Archives

Certain files don't work with Nero. It won't resample the audio, it won't resize the aspect ratio. Some of the files have been repaired but others only produce coasters. If the file size and audio are correct, I can burn under 20 min.
I'll repost my question to Rick in a new post.

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Poster: Erniest Date: May 8, 2005 8:32pm
Forum: prelinger Subject: Re: Educational And/Or Commercial Uses of the Archives

Do you have the latest package? I usually use Nerovision Express and change from NTSC to PAL and there is never a problem.
Sometimes I add spanish subtitles for my friends, but you need other programs for that. In this case, I use the encoding done with Nero and reauthor the DVD
Some of the Nero versions bundled with recorders are not fully functional

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Poster: MrMovie Date: May 9, 2005 12:19am
Forum: prelinger Subject: Re: Educational And/Or Commercial Uses of the Archives

Let me toss my two-cents worth of thoughts in here about editing since I own a video/motion picture production company and we produce and edit film, tape and DVDs on a daily basis. There are other ways of editing that do not involve the use of a computer based program within your computer. There are other options. Most people are content with purchasing a computer program to do all of their editing because they are the least expensive way to go for the average consumer. We also have computer based editing programs most of which were custom made for our needs and to our specifications. However, for certain editing projects (in real time) we use a host of various editors and programs that are NOT computer reliant. There are self-contained editing boards and decks that use everything from Mini-DV to Digi-Beta to Digital-S formats. Granted, most of these types of editing equipment is beyond the financial reach of Joe Average consumer. However, there are consumer editing decks and accessories that are within the price range of the general consumer which would permit you to DL any file off the archive and feed that out of your computer and onto an Digital Tape. Once you have it on Digital Tape you open up a whole host of options in the editing process including remastering in THX and/or remixing into Dolby Surround Sound. Making the DVD from the finished edited product using this process is as simple as playback from your source into your DVD burner. We experimented with a few films from the archive that were in 'not so great shape' and in our spare time remastered them and they came out looking like brand new prints sans a few light scratch marks here and there. A good example of this was on one of the Universal Newsreels that was listed as "Poor Quality" When we got finished with it, that "poor Quality" was all but gone. We were able to take the film and make a negative out of it, rework the negative to refine the resolution, contrast and sharpness and then produce a new positive. As for poor sound we isolated the sound track and remixed in Dolby Digital to make it crystal clear. Most people would never bother with going through all of this let alone the expense of the equipment which is why production studios and editing facilites exist. However, if you have some spare change you can get a basic editing suite for under $5,0000 that would work fine for most average consumers who want to extend there editing experiences beyond their computers.

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Poster: sgs Date: May 9, 2005 8:14am
Forum: prelinger Subject: Re: Educational And/Or Commercial Uses of the Archives


While it is true that certain files don't work with Nero out of the box, there are many shareware codices that can easily be installed to make Nero work with almost any av file type.
http://www.free-codecs.com is noe such site.